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2 votes ComicSans — 2 votes, 7 comments

As head of a team that has to support legacy browsers, I’d note the technical-vs-financial tradeoff mentioned lower down the thread. I guess this is the same sort of argument as supporting Android vs iOS - Linux is much more heterogenous and varied as an ecosystem, which is great, just like Android has many different devices. But as a software supplier, supporting that ecosystem can be really tricky, and realistically not everything will be 100%.

I think solutions to that come from a few places, eg:

  1. Developers^W Organisations should choose their scope, and be very clear about what they do and don’t support (up-front requirements, FAQs, etc) - which shouldn’t be afraid to refer back to economic reality. And they should be bold enough to refer back to that to triage tickets if needed, rather than chase all support avenues and bugs. The overhead of working out whether to support each bug or not, on an ongoing basis, is a killer.

  2. Standards probably have a role to play in setting these expectations too - if infrastructure wants to encourage diversity, then there’s a challenge to make sure that diversity can move forwards together. Intersting challenge, but it’s 7.30am here and I’m still waking up ;-)

  3. Users would ideally be understanding in the limits of their own system and the ecosystem they choose to use. This may well have been the case here - the stats don’t say much about the attitude of users - did they raise tickets, but just to keep the company informed and then didn’t mind if it wasn’t addressed? Or (at the other extreme) did they expect the company to address the issue and get angry when turned down?

But yeah, not necessarily a rare thing, but fun to think about.

Browser apps and desktop apps however are different beasts. With browsers it’s you that have to track browsers features, with desktop instead it’s the user that should install any library that is required to provide the features. Besides, I don’t understand how Linux is different from Windows in this regard. Even on Windows if you miss a library you get a big fat alert telling you that you can’t execute the program. Perhaps game developers are used to pack everything they need inside their Windows games (libraries and so forth) but when packaging for Linux they expect the system to have the library already, so at this point it’s the user that should take care of installing the correct libraries.

most gfx driver related

sooooo, it’s a drivers problem? No wonder they receive so many bug reports, all drivers for graphic cards are not open source, and notoriously work very bad on Linux!

How do the determine the sales percentage? I for example now a lot of people that play PA and dual boot. So, when one buys the game on windows but only plays it on linux, is this person then counted as Windows, Linux or user of Both.
Also i think that people that use OS Software like linux, would rather open a ticket then the basic “Press Power Button start Game” kind of User.

How do the determine the sales percentage?

When you buy a game, you buy it for a specific platform. This is likely how they count sales.

Also i think that people that use OS Software like linux, would rather open a ticket then the basic “Press Power Button start Game” kind of User.

This is what I thought as well. It’s not difficult to imagine that open source gamers are more likely to send a ticket. I’ve never in my entire life sent a ticket to EA for bugs that I found in Fifa, but I’ve sent a lot of tickets for open source games.

When you buy a game, you buy it for a specific platform. This is likely how they count sales.

But for example on steam, you don’t buy it for a specific platform. you buy it for all the available platforms.